How Much is 138% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)?

How Much is 138% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)?

Many grants and assistance programs are available to aid financially strapped single mothers all around the nation.  The government often restricts who can get these important resources depending on their income in relation to the Federal Poverty Level (FPL).

Some of the most popular programs have income limits of 138% of the Federal Poverty Level. But what exactly does that mean and how much is it in 2022? We’ll break it down for you.

Table of Contents

What is the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)?

The Federal Poverty Level, or FPL, is a number set by the United States government that determines the minimum amount of income required to fulfill basic needs like food. The number is based on a family’s gross (pre-tax) income and the number of members in the household.

Households that fall under the Federal Poverty Level are considered “poor” or “low income”, as they do not make enough money to pay for basic needs.

The income thresholds are determined by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) every year. As the costs of food and goods rise over time, the income thresholds of the Federal Poverty Limits also increase.

If you’re a struggling single mom (or anyone that needs assistance), knowing where you fall on the Federal Poverty threshold is important, as many state and federal programs are based on these levels.

Why 138% of the Federal Poverty Level is important

There are several critical state and federal programs that can help low-income families, many of which use 138% of the Federal Poverty Level in order to determine who qualifies for assistance.

In the tables below we’ll break down how much 138% of the Federal Poverty Limit is in both monthly and annual income, as well as per household size.

Please note: The Federal Poverty Levels are slightly different between the 48 contiguous U.S. states, Alaska, and Hawaii; so we’ve listed all three tables below.

138% of the Federal Poverty Level in the Contiguous United States (48 states)

Here are the breakdowns of what 138% of the Federal Poverty Level means in the 48 contiguous U.S. states (that means all states except Alaska and Hawaii).

People in HouseholdMonthly IncomeAnnual Income
1$1,563$18,754
2$2,106$25,268
3$2,648$31,781
4$3,191$38,295
5$3,734$44,809
6$4,277$51,322
7$4,820$57,836
8$5,362$64,349

138% of the Federal Poverty Level in Hawaii

138% of the Federal Poverty Level in Hawaii is slightly higher than the rest of the 48 contigous states.

People in HouseholdMonthly IncomeAnnual Income
1$1,797$21,569
2$2,422$29,063
3$3,046$36,556
4$3,671$44,050
5$4,295$51,543
6$4,920$59,036
7$5,544$66,530
8$6,169$74,023

138% of the Federal Poverty Level in Alaska

138% of the Federal Poverty Level in Alaska is higher than any other U.S. state

People in HouseholdMonthly IncomeAnnual Income
1$1,954$23,446
2$2,632$31,588
3$3,311$39,730
4$3,989$47,872
5$4,668$56,014
6$5,346$64,156
7$6,025$72,298
8$6,703$80,440

Other important thresholds

There are other important thresholds in order to determine who qualifies for certain programs. You can do the math yourself based on the Federal Poverty Levels, however, in order to help you find the answer faster we’ve put together resources for several key levels. Navigate to one of the options below to find out the income levels for key thresholds.

Conclusion

If you are looking for assistance and want to apply to certain state and federal programs, it is essential that you have a solid understanding of what the Federal Poverty Limits are and where you fall within those limits based on the amount of money you make and the number of people living in your household. The information above should make it easier for you to make that determination so that you know which programs you can qualify for.

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